Expedited Removal: What you need to know

The term “Expedited Removal” defines a process whereby undocumented immigrants can be deported from the United States by agents of the Department of Homeland Security, instead of by an immigration judge, and without the right to apply for relief from deportation. On July 22, 2019, the Trump administration announced that it would begin applying the rules of “expedited removal” to undocumented immigrants across the United States. Previously, this process was applicable only to individuals found within 100 miles of a border or port of entry to the USA, who did not have a visa, or who committed fraud or misrepresentation, and who could not show at least 14 days of physical presence.

People who claim fear of persecution in their home country, or who can provide evidence of at least two years of presence in the USA are not subject to expedited removal. Therefore, if you are undocumented, it is critical to prepare and carry copies of documentation evidencing your time in the United States. For example, copies of official documents such as birth certificates of U.S. born children, marriage certificates issued in the USA, bills, insurance records, receipts, vehicle transfers and titles, and tax returns are good evidence of physical presence in the United States. It is important to not carry false social security numbers or other false identification, and it is best to leave at home any and all identification issued by a foreign government. For a specific plan and documentary packet, please contact Walker Gates Vela PLLC at (512) 633-1785 for a consultation.

Military Families: Do you qualify for legal immigration benefits?

If you are the spouse, child, step-child, parent or step parent of a member or veteran of the U.S. military, you may be eligible to receive certain benefits, including temporary legal status, work authorization, and in some cases, lawful permanent residency. Benefits may be granted to family members of reservists, active duty members, and honorably discharged veterans of the Army, Navy, Airforce, Marines, or National Guard. For additional information and to find out if you qualify, contact WGV at 512-633-1785 to request an appointment.

Questions and Answers on the New DHS Public Charge Rules

  1. What does “Public Charge” mean? The term “public charge” is not specifically defined in the law, but it has been interpreted to mean someone who relies mostly on government assistance for their basic needs. Since 1996, the immigration laws have restricted eligibility for people who were found “likely to become a public charge.”
  2. What is the new “Public Charge” rule? The Trump administration has published a new version of this rule which, if it takes effect, will make the term “public charge” applicable to many more people. The new rule will include any prospective immigrant who has used public benefits for any period longer than 12 months in any 36-month period. The new rule also greatly expands the list of benefits which will trigger a “public charge” finding, and makes it harder for some immigrants to overcome a finding of “public charge.”
  3. When does the new rule take effect? Officially, the new rule will apply only to applications filed on or after October 15, 2019. Several lawsuits have already been filed seeking to stop the new rule from taking effect, so it remains to be seen whether the rule will be fully implemented or not.In practice, many immigration officers and consular officers are already restricting admissions of immigrants for being a “public charge.” WGV is working with clients affected by these changes to find creative ways to overcome “public charge” determinations on an individualized basis.
  4. Who does the new rule effect? The new rule will affect immigrants seeking to gain temporary employment or visitors visas, as well as persons who seek to become residents through family members such as U.S. citizen spouses, adult children, and siblings.The new rule does not affect people applying for residency under the Violence Against Women Act, U visa recipients, or asylum seekers.The rule does not apply to people who are already lawful permanent residents, and will NOT be a factor for applicants for naturalization to U.S. citizenship.
  5. What benefits are included in the new rule, and which are not included? Any use of public benefits by an applicant for lawful immigration status may be problematic under the new rules, though some are clearly more problematic than others. The benefits specifically named on the list in the new rules will be considered a “heavily weighted negative factor,” meaning their use will be hard to overcome for purposes of a public charge determination.

 

  Negative Factor for “Public Charge” Determinations:   Not considered  for “Public Charge” Determinations:
Social Security Income x  
Temporary Aid for Needy Families x  
Medicaid for adults x  
SNAP (Food stamps) x  
Section 8 Housing Vouchers x  
Section 8 Rental Assistance x  
Public Housing x  
Emergency Medicaid    
Special education services & Head Start    
Medicaid for children    
Medicaid for pregnant women until 60 days post-partum    
Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP)    
Disaster Relief    

 

  1. What should I do if my family is using public benefits? Whether or not to access public benefits for your family may now be a more complicated decision than it was in the past. The new “public charge” rules claim to not penalize immigrants whose children use public benefits. However, in reality, the spirit of the new rules includes the intent to force immigrants to choose between
  2. What other factors are important for the “Public Charge” determination?
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